Sunday, August 20, 2006

Moving up the escalator

Monday morning bright and sharp, I got off the train. I run ahead of everyone, wanting to be the first one getting on the escalator. After all, the goal is to beat the rush hour traffic and get to work early. Strangely, no one else feels as eager as I, to get on. How is that? But, I don't get a chance to think about an answer for my brain quickly switches to solving a much bigger problem. I can't move up this escalator! I try to take one step--up that is--but I lose my balance. I let go of my purse and lunch box and hold on to the rails tightly. I take one more step. Okay, I am going to make it, I think to myself. You wish. I lose my balance and fall on all four. Ouch that hurts. My knee is bleeding and I feel a sharp pain on my side. I can't let that get me down. Oh no! I am now further away from the top. A scary thought crosses my mind; I might die on this stupid escalator. I can't let that happen. I pull myself together. Get up. Grab the rails so tightly that my knuckles turn white and I climb. I finally make it. I pinch myself to see if I am awake or if this has all been a bad dream. The blood is dripping down my leg. It can't be a dream. I am all confused. I take this escalator every morning. In fact this escalator is the only reason I trek the platform all the way to get on the first car. I look down. Who on earth could have foolishly changed the direction of the escalator. It clearly has the sign "Going up"?!!!

I see a few gathered down the escalator. One is holding my bags. I can't hear what they are saying. But, I bet they are asking one another, who on earth these bags belongs to.

I better go get my bags...I have to move on. I have no time to stand here feel sorry for myself and angry at the person who did this to me!

Couple hours later, after I have vented my anger to one of the station superintendents, placed a band aid on my knee, which I had almost forgotten I had in my wallet, told my story to half a dozen people; I feel much better. In fact, a smile lits my face every time I think about the incident; definitely something to remember for years to come.

Friday, August 04, 2006

Finch Station is different ...

She plays keyboard and he plays violin. Together they create the most delighful music that ranges from "Waves of the Danube" to "La Cumparsita". As I proceed with my morning commute through Finch Station I listen to the art Indulis and Ilga Suna create. Each and everyday when I listen to them I feel the surge of excitement then comes the goose bumps as I hum the familiar tune, eventually I launch into this very happy go lucky mood that lasts even after the music fades away and through the hectic morning commute.

A great quote

"Most people say that it is the intellect which makes a great scientist. They are wrong: it is character."
— Albert Einstein, Swiss-American mathematician, physicist, and public philosopher (1879-1955)